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Mission Playbook:
A Design-Driven Approach to Launching and Driving Missions

Explore our Playbook, new cases, learnings, and interviews on our design-driven approach to launching and driving missions here

Our Mission Playbook from 2022 is ready for an update. On this page, you can find new articles and the first version of our playbook.

The content gives anyone interested in mission-driven innovation knowledge, inspiration, and in-depth examples of how to get started on working mission-driven.

We still fundamentally believe that missions can be a powerful frame for:

  • Achieving significant societal goals
  • Mobilizing resources
  • Linking activities across different disciplines, research types, and innovation
  • Driving systemic change
  • Making it easier for citizens to understand the value of research and innovation.

And we still fundamentally believe that the three pillars of a mission are:

  1. Mobilizing ecosystems
  2. Building capacity
  3. Setting direction

 

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How to read the content

Depending on how well-acquainted you are with mission-driven innovation, you can start with whatever content you find most relevant. Our design-driven approach to missions is repeated in several articles.

Here is a short overview for your convenience:

  1. Mission Playbook 1.0: A Design-Driven Approach to Launching and Driving Missions
    Our first version of the Playbook from 2022 gives you an overall introduction to launching missions and the model we use. We continue to elaborate on this approach, which you can explore in the other articles. 

    Read the Playbook
    here.
  2. What Characterizes Organizations that Work Mission-Driven?
    This article gives you eight qualities that must be present for mission-driven organizations to succeed. The qualities are applicable no matter your organizational structure – as long as you can create pockets for experiments. We also coin a new role for designers – their skills are pivotal in mission-driven and future-fit organizations.

    Read the article
    here.
  3. A Case from Japan: The New Role of Large Companies in Mission-Driven Innovation
    “We think a mission-oriented approach would be key to working for a broader impact with various stakeholders,” says IHI, a Japanese manufacturing firm. This article examines large corporations’ roles in leading a mission for societal impact. There are three core aspects of a new value model creation and four critical enablers for implementing the model.

    Read the article
    here.
  4. Five Reflections: Letting The Imagination Bloom for Design-Driven Missions
    This article explores a handful of practical lessons we’ve learned through our work trying to envision an actionable way out of collapse. How can we let the imagination flourish in a time of creative drought?

    Read the article
    here.
  5. Conversation with Cameron Tonkinwise: Missions and Transition Design(ers)
    This piece is a conversation between Professor Cameron Tonkinwise, Research Director of the Design Innovation Research Centre at UTS — University of Technology Sydney and co-initiator of Transition Design, among countless other things, and our Design & Futures Lead Oskar Stokholm Østergaard on design-driven missions, transition design, and the role of design and designers in radical societal change.

    Read the article
    here.
  6. Mission-Oriented Innovation in Prevention and Population-Based Healthcare
    In this new article, we explore the role of mission-oriented innovation in prevention and population-based healthcare. You learn about three Danish cases and five characteristics of mission-oriented research and innovation.

    Read the article here.

Do you want to know more about working with mission-driven innovation? Reach out to us!

Related articles, tools, cases, and projects:

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